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Sony PVM or FSi

 
Author desmondqford
ZRO
#1 | Posted: 16 Oct 2012 16:02 | Edited by: desmondqford 
I'll be purchasing my first broadcast reference monitor this month or next. I think I have it narrowed down to either the 25" Sony PVM or the 24" Flanders Scientific, both of which max out my budget.

I will be using it for color grading with DaVinci Resolve 9.0. Most of the stuff I do is web bound, but I want to change that.

I would like the community's opinion on the pros or cons of either monitor. Or any other suggestions within the $6,000 and below price range...


dezzy

Author Steve

INF
Male
#2 | Posted: 17 Oct 2012 07:39 
We like and use the Penta HD2line range of displays a lot...

http://www.hd2line.com/

I personally do not like the FSI as all - and we have calibrated quite a few of them

The Sony is good though.

Steve
Steve Shaw
Mob Boss at Light Illusion

Author TonyMan
ZRO
#3 | Posted: 18 Oct 2012 17:10 
Steve

Is it possible to emulate P3 using the Penta HD2line?

Tony

Author Steve

INF
Male
#4 | Posted: 18 Oct 2012 19:32 
I have yet to find ANY LCD monitor that can do P3 accurately...
You are better off doing Rec709 accurately and then converting to P3 after the grading - that will be 100% accurate.
Working P3 on a display that is not 100% accurate will cause problems that can't easily be corrected.
We have had clients that have assumed 91% P3 was good enough, and then suffered the results being very different when viewed on a 100% accurate dispay, or worse, colour space converted to Rec709.

Steve
Steve Shaw
Mob Boss at Light Illusion

Author TonyMan
ZRO
#5 | Posted: 18 Oct 2012 20:26 
Steve

There have been other discussions on this forum about using a projector (possibly projection design models) that is accurate for 709 and then emulating P3. I take it this is possible since the projector would have the required range to achieve good results. What about the "doubly" LCD monitor. Does it truly meet P3?

Author Steve

INF
Male
#6 | Posted: 18 Oct 2012 20:30 
Many projectors can do P3 accurately.
Few monitors can...
The Dolby I we have not personally checked, so we can't comment on it.
But, we have been told it can do P3 accurately.
It should be able to
Steve Shaw
Mob Boss at Light Illusion

Author Gabriele Turchi
ZRO
#7 | Posted: 19 Oct 2012 03:49 
how would you guys describe the REAL WORLD limitations of work on 709 setup to than go P3 ?
I get that the conversion can be 100% loyal to what color decision has been made on the 709 display (because P3 is larger than 709) , but i am wondering realistically (so NOT on PAPER ) that smaller Gamut (709) how much could compromise the color correction choices ...
I mean , have a wider palette is off course better (on PAPER) , but realistically , unless the images are all about incredibly smooth gradients ... i think that maybe a real world scenario does not deed that extra gamut ..

what it can make the difference is the use of a projector versus a display ... brightness level etc.. that i have the feeling is more important than have P3 color space covered while making color decisions ...

ps: steve : working on a 709 display for P3 delivery : would you recommend the brightness to be lower than usual ? i mean the 709 to P3 XYZ , would address only Gamut , white point , gamma ... not brightness right ?

or is better have the 709 display around 100cdmq ?

thanks

g

Author Steve

INF
Male
#8 | Posted: 19 Oct 2012 08:40 
To be honest, there are no real-world limitations...
The additional gamut in P3 is outside the natural colours you see in the reel world, so the variation between Rec709 ans P3 is very small in the real world...

The P3 additional gamut has nothing to do with gradients either. That is all down to bit depth; nothing else.

Projection brightness vs. a monitor also has nothing to do with P3 vs Rec709. That is just the way the different displays are set-up.
But, most projection environments are blacked-out rooms, while room setups with monitors tend to be illuminated in some way, so that tends to negate the actual screen brightness issues.

However, we always set monitor brightness to approx 85 to 100 nits, not the greater SMPTE 'standard' as that standard has never really been used as the older CRT displays flared badly as such levels.

So, 85 to 100 Nits has become the real world standard.

Steve
Steve Shaw
Mob Boss at Light Illusion

Author Gabriele Turchi
ZRO
#9 | Posted: 19 Oct 2012 14:10 
thanks steve ,

Nice to hear that grade on "perfect 709 calibrated (not my panasonic plasma ) for P3 delivery doe not limit the creativity and color decisions ...

And you are absolutely right, gradients are related/require higher bit dept , but what i meant was "particular tonality of hues of colors that might need unusual tones " , not the usual skin tones or grass , or yellow cab ...

ps: 85 sounds fare considering the brightness of a typical color room versus the brightness of a theater , but do you think that having a color room pitch black )wall tinted etc...) the monitor should be darker , or because of the different technology , still should be brighter ?

also : for just broadcast deliverables application don't you think 85 is quite a risk ? , considering that today's consumer LCD and Plasmas are set around 150 by default (computer monitor as well )

thanks

g

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 Sony PVM or FSi

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