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Digital Cinematography Light Illusion Forums / Digital Cinematography /

Projector & monitoring thread

Author deadvoid
Mono
#1 | Posted: 31 Jan 2012 08:41 
Hi guys,

Glad DI tech has found a new home... i figure i should make a general thread here for monitoring since it's very relevant to my interest, please correct me if i'm not allowed to do so...

So first of all i'm a general technical employee (for a lack of better term) for a DI facility in Jakarta eager to learn the technical world of color and what's involved in it. Pretty ambitious i know, but gotta start somewhere right :D

To start, i'd like to know if there's anybody here that can recommend me a good but not so expensive 2K projector (Mr Steve? ), i'd say below Christie or Barco. The reason is because i really have no idea how much those would cost and what's the range for mid class projector (instead of high end) would be, and what caveats would it be beside not as good those high end projectors.

Appreciate your inputs, i'll be asking a lot of questions in the future, hope you guys don't mind.

Author Sundeep
Mono
#2 | Posted: 31 Jan 2012 11:37 
Hi Deadvoid

Please feel free to post here. Not a problem.

In my opinion a good 2K Projectors these days should be able to do P3 colour space and project long throw. Having said that not all 2K projectors do that. And I would only recommend a good 2K projector only if you have a room big enough for such a requirement..... If your facility in Jakarta is a boutique set up then I would more than happily suggest a Projection Design Cineo 82 which is a 3 chip projector capable of P3 colourspace and very easy to calibrate and maintain....

Hope this helps. Please feel free to ask more questions.

Regards
Sundeep

Author deadvoid
Mono
#3 | Posted: 2 Feb 2012 05:21 | Edited by: deadvoid 
Hi Sundeep

Thanks for your reply
I'm not sure i understand with what "project long throw" means, care to elaborate? In regards with room size, what screen size usually required for 2K projector projection?

Also, for signal input connection with high (10bit or more) color depth, wouldn't HD-SDI be a requirement since i saw a lot of projectors with HDMI connection instead of HD-SDI?

Author Sundeep
Mono
#4 | Posted: 2 Feb 2012 11:18 
Hi Deadvoid

Long throw projection is best described as any projection over long distances, usually farther than 25 -30 feet or more and a width of above 15 to 20 feet....

There are various formulas to calculate screen size but the best thing to do is use the Lens/screen size calculator provided by projector manufacturer, by punching in distance from screen to projector depending on room size....

HDMI is 10 bit and most DCI projectors these days are available with multiple inputs that include HDMI as well as HD-SDI. HD-SDI on the Cineos are optional. You need to ask for it!

Regards
Sundeep

Author Nepomuk
Mono
#5 | Posted: 19 Feb 2012 07:03 
to continue deadvoid's thread:

Choosing the monitoring is whats left for me equipping me little suite. I hoped to attach the cineo32, or what its called today, directly to the nvidia quadro hdmi and my grading display to the dvi port. But monitoring should be in the signal path. Isn't there an efficient way to monitor the RGB signal and not use SDI and an omnitek? I do only a file based worklow, and trying to keep it simple.

Getting a blackmagic hdlink and ultrascope for my 2nd workstation seems a cheap solution, but its not in the path and 422 only, though I could then go sdi and use an sdi hdmi converter to go into the projector.
But its inaccurate for filmout and DCP? What does it mean to the vectorscope and rgb parade exactly? Interpolated, lower resolution measurements?

Your help is appreciated.

Author Steve
Scene
#6 | Posted: 19 Feb 2012 08:45 
We have done a lot of comparisons to the various outputs from different DI systems, and often the non-professional outputs are not accurate.

We always recommend using the same signal outputs for monitoring as will be used for any broadcast deliverables, or are dedicated outputs from the main DI system software, rather than the standard GUI outputs.

But, a good waveform monitor is something we always specify for any DI system - we feel it is impossible to grade accurately without one. With the BMD Ultrascopes I find them too small, but I know many do use them.

One thing you MUST get control over is signal levels - full range data vs. legal TV. If you don't understand how to manage this you will have problems.

Author Nepomuk
Mono
#7 | Posted: 19 Feb 2012 18:06 
I have time, I will understand. ;)

Hamlet's Vidscope, it can do 444. Combined with 444 sdi or hdmi capture card, what do you think of it?

Author Steve
Scene
#8 | Posted: 21 Feb 2012 09:31 
Never used Hamlet kit. I like the way OmniTek works, so have focused on that for our installations...

Author Nepomuk
Mono
#9 | Posted: 22 Feb 2012 05:44 
I like omnitek too, but look, I found another software scope: 4kscope by drastic technologies. It needs a Cona. Another software scope is Scopebox, it wastes screen space, as it seems.

on the hardware site I found Harris, Tektronix, and Leader.

Author Steve
Scene
#10 | Posted: 22 Feb 2012 08:52 
Lots of options - too many for all to be purchased and tested by us
We can comment only on the tools we have used, which is OmniTek and BMD Ultrascope as the most common.

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